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Oolong, Wulong and Wu Long, what are the differences?

Oolong tea is a class of Chinese teas that are semi-fermented. Oolongl, Wulong and Wulong are translations of different Fu Jian dialects referring to 'dark red dragon' in Chinese.

I have come crossed some questions recently on Linked in which I believed are for many:

  • Hello XXX, do please throw some light which is the best area which produces the best Oolong tea. I thought Taiwan was superior. Anything better still? XXX
  • Taiwan does have outstanding oolongs, and many people consider them to be some of the best -- especially their high mountain oolongs. Personally we buy most of our oolongs from Taiwan, but favour China for many of our top quality green tea and white tea.
  • I would like to add a comment to XXX's question - In my mind, Oolong is not the same as Wulong. Oolong tea is a short fermented (less oxidized) tea with less color and closer to a green tea and Wulong which is also called Wu Yi Oolong is a more fermented (more oxidized) tea with more color, closer to a black tea. Some of the less oxidized high elevation Oolongs come from Taiwan, but China is gaining ground in this sector also. Wu Yi Oolong on the other hand comes only from China. I am open to correction.

My response to this: Hi every one, I am from Fu Jian province - the birth place of Oolong teas. Here is some info on our site regarding Oolong, Wulong and Wu Long: https://www.valleygreentea.com.au/oolong-wulong-tea/oolong-tea-inf.html Teas are categorised by degree of fermentation: green teas are unfermented, black teas are fully fermented and Oolong teas are semi-fermented. It is a class of teas including Taiwan Oolong and Wu Yi rock teas. Wulong is just a different version of English translation from a different Fu Jian dialect. The Fu Jian province is the birth place of Oolong teas. One of the most popular one is called Tie Guan Yin and some early migrants took it to Taiwan, modified it over the years to become Tiawan Oolong. Tiawan Oolong is produced by slightly different method and more fermented than Fu Jian Tie Guan Yin. Taste wise, it has a stronger after taste, but less up front floral aroma. Wu Yi rock tea is a sub-class of Oolong tea, produced in Wu Yi mountain area of the Fu Jian province. Because the bushes are grown of rocky mountains and they have their own unique making method, people tend to call them Wu Yi rock tea as a sub-category. Hope this is of some help.

 

Last modified onWednesday, 20 July 2016 13:24
En Jie Rudd

The founder and owner of Valley Green Tea

I grew up in the Fu-Jian Province – the tea country of China. Tea drinking has been part of our daily life for as long as I can remember.

While I was working as a public health researcher a few years ago, I read many research reports conducted over the last 30 years about the health benefits of green tea in fighting certain life style related challenges such as cancer, obesity, cardio-vascular and inflammatory diseases etc.

From my research, I realised there is a significant gap between what people consume (i.e. commercial tea bags) for assumed health benefits and the actual benefits that have been enjoyed by the Chinese for a long history from the premium loose leaf teas.

As well as being potentially beneficial to health, the premium loose teas (green tea being the biggest group) are most enjoyable beverages with a fascinating history, colourful culture and holistically dynamic in every aspect.

It is my passion to share, not only the products, but also the whole culture dynamics around the premium teas with the tea enthusiasts, here in Australia and around the world.

Valley Green Tea currently supplis a diverse range of premium loose teas to the tea drinking community that suit all tastes and all cultures and to pass on a deep understanding of the history and benefits of this wonder beverage.

Website: https://www.valleygreentea.com.au
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